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Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

3 edition of Inventing the business of opera found in the catalog.

Inventing the business of opera

Beth Lise Glixon

Inventing the business of opera

the impresario and his world in seventeenth-century Venice

by Beth Lise Glixon

  • 86 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in New York, NY .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementBeth L. Glixon, Jonathan E. Glixon.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsML
The Physical Object
Paginationxxvi, 398 p. :
Number of Pages398
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22721026M
ISBN 100195154169

The systems they createdstill survive, in part, ing the Business of Opera explores public opera in its infancy, from to , when theater owners and impresarios established Venice as the operatic capital of : Kent Underwood. The extravagant business of opera The extravagant business of opera Heller, Wendy Wendy Heller The extravagant business of opera Beth L. Glixon and Jonathan E. Glixon, Inventing the business of opera: the impresario and his world in 17th- century Venice (New York: Oxford University Press, ), $50 / £ Opera has always been an expensive and .

The history of the book starts with the development of writing, and various other inventions such as paper and printing, and continues through to the modern day business of book printing. The earliest history of books actually predates what would conventionally be called "books" today and begins with tablets, scrolls, and sheets of papyrus. Opera management is the management of the processes by which opera is delivered to audiences. It is carried out by an opera manager, also called a general manager, managing director, or intendant (UK English). A multifaceted task, it involves managing an opera company, primarily the singers and musicians who perform the operas, but in many cases also involves .

In this book, Eugene J. Johnson traces the invention of the opera house, a building type of world wide importance. Italy laid the foundation theater buildings in the West, in architectural spaces invented for the commedia dell'arte in the sixteenth century, and theaters built to present the new art form of opera in the seventeenth. After discussing the management of comedy theaters in Venice, this chapter examines the financial structure behind the opera business, exploring various sources of income, such as investors, loans, rental of seats and boxes, advances from the printer, and ticket sales. While the renters and managers of the comedy theaters usually came from the noble class, opera .


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Inventing the business of opera by Beth Lise Glixon Download PDF EPUB FB2

Inventing the Business of Opera explores public opera in its infancy, from towhen theater owners and impresarios established Venice as the operatic capital of Europe.

Drawing on extensive new documentation, the book studies all of the components necessary to opera production, from the financial backing of various populations of Cited by: 1.

This is a brilliant very informatove book and anyone who works in the performing arts industry will sppreciate the real world business details this book outlines for how opera was produced, paid for and funded in Venice - some things are very very familar i still want to know Inventing the business of opera book the Nuns of Saint Alvise got ducats!!!/5.

Book Description. The study of the business of opera has taken on new importance in the present harsh economic climate for the arts. This book presents research that sheds new light on a range of aspects concerning marketing, audience development, promotion, arts administration and economic issues that beset professionals working in the opera world.

Inventing the Business of Opera The Impresario and His World in Seventeenth Century Venice Beth Glixon and Jonathan Glixon AMS Studies in Music. A volume in the prestigious AMS Studies in Music series; Narrates an important period in the history of opera from the point of view of an entrepreneur who backed the productions.

This book explores public opera in its infancy, from towhen theater owners and impresarios, drawing on the models of the already existent theaters for comedy, established Venice as the operatic capital of Europe.

Based on new documentation, the book studies all of the components necessary for opera production, from the financial backing and the issue of. Inventing the Business of Opera explores public opera in its infancy, from towhen theater owners and impresarios established Venice as the operatic capital of Europe.

Drawing on extensive new documentation, the book studies all of the components necessary to opera production, from the financial backing of various populations of. Inventing the Business of Opera by Beth Glixon,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(6).

The systems they created still survive, in part, ing the Business of Opera explores public opera in its infancy, from towhen theater owners and impresarios established Venice as the operatic capital of Europe. Book. Inventing the Business of Opera Jonathan Glixon and Beth Glixon.

Inventing the Business of Opera explores public opera in its infancy, bringing to life the men and women who successfully established the new genre on the stages of Venice during the seventeenth All of the components necessary to opera production are highlighted, from the financial backing, to the libretto and the score, to the singers, dancers.

The systems they created still survive, in part, today. Inventing the Business of Opera explores public opera in its infancy, from towhen theater owners and impresarios established Venice as the operatic capital of Europe.

Drawing on extensive new documentation, the book studies all of the components necessary to opera production.

Description - Inventing the Business of Opera by Beth Glixon In mid seventeenth-century Venice, opera first emerged from courts and private drawing rooms to become a form of public entertainment. Early commercial operas were elaborate spectacles, featuring ornate costumes and set design along with dancing and music.

Get this from a library. Inventing the business of opera: the impresario and his world in seventeenth-century Venice. [Beth Lise Glixon; Jonathan E Glixon] -- "Inventing the Business of Opera explores public opera in its infancy, from towhen theater owners and impresarios established Venice as the operatic capital of Europe.

But a new book has rediscovered the high art of these exquisite theater spaces. The Most Beautiful Opera Houses in the World contains hundreds of photographs showing the exteriors and auditoriums of these cultural treasures―and is a reminder why these architectural wonders are worth a visit.” ―(15).

The extravagant business of opera Inventing the business of opera provides a sober reminder of the inherent creativity of archival scholarship and the riches that can be uncovered only through dedicated toil by those steeped in knowledge of the material. There is an enormous amount of information for the reader to absorb in this book Author: Wendy Heller.

The systems they created still survive, in part, today. Inventing the Business of Opera explores public opera in its infancy, from towhen theater owners and impresarios established Venice as the operatic capital of Europe/5(K).

Jonathan E. Glixon is the author of Inventing the Business of Opera ( avg rating, 6 ratings, 1 review, published )/5. The first part, ‘The Business of Opera’, provides the larger picture, introducing the foundations of Venetian opera, its finances, management, and the considerable precariousness inherent in its world.

Particularly interesting is Chapter 2, ‘The Boxes: A Major Source of Income’. Inventing the Business of Opera: The Impresario and His World in Seventeenth-Century Venice (review) Article in Renaissance Quarterly 59(4) December with 18 ReadsAuthor: Andrew Dell'antonio.

While their book is not an obvious starting place for a newcomer to the field of seventeenth-century opera (it does not replace Rosand’s classic Opera in RENAISSANCE QUARTERLY. Seventeenth-Century Venice, nor is it meant to), Inventing the Business of Opera will be a touchstone for all scholars of early modern Italian music.

Indeed. Inventing Earth, Boulder, Colorado. likes. A sense of wonder. Inventive, creative minds sharing the joy of living and beauty of the natural world. Creativity that .The Arts of Chinese Opera: A Historical Perspective Inventing the Business of Opera: The Impresario and His World in Seventeenth-Century Venice.Book Review: Inventing The Future.

assuming that workers have free choice to take whatever deal the business offers. That is, compare a world in which a factory pays $, per year to operate a car-making robot, and you get a $30, a year basic income, vs. a world where a company pays $50, per year to hire a car-building employee.